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What to do during a terrorist incident

Location Current threat level
UK Severe
Ireland Severe

The threat level from international terrorism in the UK is SEVERE, meaning an attack is highly likely. The national advice is simple; if you're caught up in an incident; 
  • RUN if you can 
  • HIDE if you can't 
  • TELL - call police and warn others to stay away.
For further information view gov.uk/ACT. 'Make Nothing Happen'.

How can someone with disabilities follow the Run Hide Tell advice?

Police advice in the event of a firearms or weapons attack is that people should Run, Hide, Tell (RHT). Wherever possible Run to a place of safety. If there’s nowhere to go, then Hide. Finally, and only when it is safe to do so, Tell the police by calling 999. All situations are different and we recognise that people’s ability to Run, Hide, Tell will vary for reasons such as age, fitness and capability.

When running is not an option, people should make every effort to move away from the area as quickly as they can. The RHT guidance highlights the importance of people caught up in such a scenario assisting those around them who may need help.

Should an attack take place in a workplace, companies also have a duty of care to make provision to facilitate the evacuation of disabled employees, and should have a bespoke plan in place in the event of an emergency situation.

How does the Run Hide Tell guidance apply to deaf and hard of hearing people specifically?

The Run Hide Tell advice highlights the importance of people who are caught up in a firearms or weapons attack, wherever possible, assisting those around them who may need help to move away from danger. For example someone who is deaf or hard of hearing may be unable to tell where a source of a gunshot may be coming from so may be unsure in which direction to go.

The initial priorities for officers who respond to a firearms or weapons attack will be to assess the threat and risk, as well as the potential vulnerability of anyone caught up in the incident.

Our firearms officers receive core training on how to deal with different communities, including those who are deaf or hard of hearing. This includes deaf awareness and pointers on how to interact with deaf or hard of hearing members of the public and reminds them that they need to consider factors such as sensory impairment or communications difficulties.
Download the Run Hide Tell posters below to display in your community:

English
Hebrew
Hindi
Nepali
Punjabi
Urdu
Arabic

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